Why there are no arrests yet over the Panama Papers

The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists published on Wednesday a roundtable of roughly three dozen individuals who control major offshore companies, trusts and foundations. The Guardian published on Thursday another seven politicians who appear…

Why there are no arrests yet over the Panama Papers

The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists published on Wednesday a roundtable of roughly three dozen individuals who control major offshore companies, trusts and foundations. The Guardian published on Thursday another seven politicians who appear on the powerful list. CNN Money published on Friday three names, including Edward Snowden.

The authors of the list and various intelligence and tax experts have reported on some of the people named for years, but the influence of the stakes of the leak are now becoming clearer.

“I think this is a high impact news story because not only are journalists now able to put those people on paper, as well as the places that they have these companies, but this type of information is an opportunity for citizens and people in power to make change,” Sheldon Goldman, editor of Canadian Reader, told CNN Money.

The reason why not all of the names have been arrested, so far

Canada has very strict rules in which authorities are allowed to lay charges when it comes to tax evasion, racketeering and foreign bribery. But experts say Canada is a less serious offender and has fewer resources to tackle tax evasion and transnational criminal crimes.

“We don’t have the resources for (charging) a lot of those kinds of cases,” said John MacPhee, professor of public international law at the University of Ottawa. “It’s mostly enforcement agencies looking in and letting Canadian taxpayers know they are not doing what they should be doing.”

Story highlights

Citizens, companies and political leaders are named in document that could force investigation

Experts say Canada is less serious offender

Leave a Comment