The new HPV vaccine concerns physicians

Play Audio Clip Listen to audio clip. The risk of infection for pregnant women and their infants is very real and doctors often use the Zika virus as a cautionary tale. But a report…

The new HPV vaccine concerns physicians

Play Audio Clip Listen to audio clip.

The risk of infection for pregnant women and their infants is very real and doctors often use the Zika virus as a cautionary tale. But a report has now found that during the first six months after being vaccinated, babies are just as susceptible to other flu strains as adults.

FOX’s Stacey Dales reports in the “FOX & Friends First” segment:

An Australian study looking at over 80 countries with millions of children under the age of three found that those babies who were vaccinated with H1N1 or the swine flu were just as susceptible to that virus in their first six months as kids who had not been vaccinated. They found that pregnant women who got vaccinated had a poorer, more sluggish response to the vaccine that normal women.

Many pregnant women opt to not get vaccinated before giving birth, because of how often the shot runs in pregnancy and how long it takes the pain to subside. But the doctors behind the study say it’s perfectly safe to vaccinate and there’s no advantage for them and their babies.

Meantime, the CDC says cases of the West Nile virus have spiked nationwide. The CDC has reported 706 cases across the country this year, up from about 485 cases just this summer. As of Friday, 472 of those cases were reported in California, 100 in Texas and 35 in New York. All three states report cases of people being hospitalized for the West Nile virus.

In other health news, it’s yet another report that shows routine checks at doctors’ offices for cervical cancer, resulting in missed screenings, are not happening in enough U.S. schools. But despite the recommendations the World Health Organization says screening rates are still going down.

Doctors in America don’t use mammograms all that often anymore because the radiation used is way more harmful than they care to take. And now the World Health Organization has released a new recommendation for radiologists and lab technicians – know as dose-related breast screening. Radiologists are meant to screen an estimated 1.5 million women a year, and work in a large group of women for very different reasons. For example, some are diagnosed with abnormalities while others never find one that could be life-threatening. That makes it a more complicated and difficult process to make mistakes, a new report said.

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