Finnegans Wake and the comic-book genre

Bloomsday is a festival in Dublin celebrating James Joyce’s famous novel Finnegans Wake. In the 1920s, celebration evolved into the June 14-16 Irish literary and cultural festival of readings, workshops, concerts and others events…

Finnegans Wake and the comic-book genre

Bloomsday is a festival in Dublin celebrating James Joyce’s famous novel Finnegans Wake. In the 1920s, celebration evolved into the June 14-16 Irish literary and cultural festival of readings, workshops, concerts and others events dedicated to Joyce’s work.

Joyce completed Finnegans Wake in 1922, however, but it took another 38 years to be published in the US. Many of Joyce’s works have been published sporadically – including a recently discovered version of Ulysses in the US – since his death in 1941.

Marvel is now taking its characters into entirely different worlds, through a wide variety of adventures with mixed success. Marvel’s Universe – a web of interconnected stories based loosely on Shakespeare’s known stories – gave life to X-Men; the films have made more than $2.5bn globally, but Marvel Studios has faced a lot of criticism for not catering to the demands of the modern movie-going audience.

The trio of Ryan Coogler, Joe Russo and Anthony Russo, acclaimed directors of the Black Panther, Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Avengers: Infinity War, respectively, are currently in production for their next Marvel movie, currently titled Untitled Avengers.

Their description of the Untitled Avengers was vague, but the details of the plot suggest that the initial team (Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, Black Widow and Hawkeye) could soon be joined by Spider-Man, Black Panther, the Vision, Ant-Man and the Wasp, Doctor Strange, Rocket Raccoon, Groot and more.

As has been well known, Disney acquired Marvel Entertainment for $4bn in 2009 – in return, Disney held ownership of the comic book company and the rights to its intellectual property.

But the rights for TV and film projects are still held by Marvel’s competition, namely Time Warner. After the largest media company on the planet met stiff competition from 21st Century Fox, it finally inked a deal for majority ownership of the former in late March, in which Time Warner will be able to leverage its Marvel-owned properties into a television and film empire.

In a separate arrangement with 21st Century Fox, Disney also owns the Star Wars and Frozen movie franchises.

In the decades since Marvel entered the comic book business in 1964, many of its best-known characters have appeared on other mediums, including cartoons, video games, TV series and animated films.

Iron Man is now an iconic franchise, but the 2002 feature film wasn’t even supposed to be a comic book adaptation at first.

Marvel’s cinematic universe goes back to the moment Robert Downey Jr’s Tony Stark appeared in the first Iron Man in 2008, which also introduced Mickey Rourke’s Ivan Vanko, aka Whiplash, as a potential enemy.

© Marvel Studios/YouTube

Rourke went on to star in films including Sin City, Eat Pray Love and The Expendables. He died in 2007 at age 56.

Whiplash made his first live-action appearance in 2013’s Iron Man 3, the third in the franchise to be directed by Shane Black. Whiplash, a villain with the ability to develop a formidable arsenal of weapons, was played by Guy Pearce, who ended up being replaced in Iron Man 4 by Sir Ben Kingsley.

Since then, the franchise has continued to grow, with almost three movies to hit the big screen each year, including Avengers: Infinity War in 2018 and Ant-Man and the Wasp in 2018, as well as the upcoming Captain Marvel, which will be directed by Ryan Fleck, who co-wrote the script.

Leave a Comment