David Fox, former ‘Star Trek IV’ and ‘Star Trek VI’ actor, dead at 83

Ottawa — Theatre actor David Fox — famed for his stage roles in the 1970s and 1980s, as well as for his film appearances, died in New York on Friday, the Ottawa Citizen reported….

David Fox, former ‘Star Trek IV’ and ‘Star Trek VI’ actor, dead at 83

Ottawa — Theatre actor David Fox — famed for his stage roles in the 1970s and 1980s, as well as for his film appearances, died in New York on Friday, the Ottawa Citizen reported. He was 83.

Fox was born in Ottawa on May 9, 1933. He attended the University of Ottawa before leaving in 1952 for study at the Oberlin Conservatory in Ohio, where he pursued a master’s degree in English theatre. After some choice television work, he returned to Ottawa to perform in a series of shows that included “A Canada of Thyme” and “Onward.”

As he later told the Citizen, he returned to the Ontario capital in a matter of days because it had taken just “a few days to get the written-it-off and go home.” By then, he had played “little rogue Spencer Moreh and Felix Potter in Bob Cushman’s very funny productions of Dickens’s A Christmas Carol and Oliver Twist,” and was enjoying a career “that paid a lot of money,” according to the Citizen.

By 1970, Fox’s career had spawned a few opportunities in Hollywood. He had two roles in Peter Weir’s adaptation of “Frankenstein,” and he appeared in “The Martians,” “Top Secret!,” “The Last of the Mohicans” and “Tall Story.”

In 1981, Fox took a much more substantial role — that of the leader of an intergalactic traveller whose discovery of alien technology opens Pandora’s Box in the classic sci-fi flick “Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.” He also appeared in the 1985 sequel, “Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.”

Fox also made several notable appearances on CBC television, which aired several productions with his name attached to them. He was proud of both “A Canada of Thyme” and “Onward,” telling the Citizen that “both were well-made, rich productions, with a lot of actors in them,” he said. “Onward at the Maison de la Chanson was very dramatic, and ‘A Canada of Thyme’ had a lot of action.”

Back in Canada, Fox resumed his career in 1978, when he starred in the dramatic comedy “The Forest,” directed by René Arcand.

He also appeared in films like “Belleville Rendez-Vous,” “Leave Her to Heaven,” “Les enfants du Paradis” and “The Doors.”

His last appearance was in the 2015 remake of Stephen King’s novel “Doctor Sleep,” but he left acting behind years earlier. He retired from acting in his mid-60s, opting to remain in Canada and write, the Citizen reported.

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